29 Sep '17, 6am

British prisoner’s artworks offer rare lighthearted take on life under the Japanese. https://t.co/qUUYwcBtfU

British prisoner’s artworks offer rare lighthearted take on life under the Japanese. https://t.co/qUUYwcBtfU

During the Japanese Occupation, the Japanese military held numerous prisoners of war (POWs) and internees at Changi Prison and several camps. Former police inspector William R.M. Haxworth, an internee at Changi Prison and Sime Road Camp, was among them. During his time there, he secretly drew over 300 small paintings and sketches. His artworks give us a glimpse into life in the POW camps. They not only documented the difficult living conditions, but often included a light-hearted (and sometimes humourous) spin on their daily lives. People came to know about Haxworth and his drawings when his wife donated his entire set of sketches to the National Archives of Singapore in 1986. We have shared some of them here. Advertisement Resourcefulness Haxworth’s drawings are proof of resilience and resourcefulness shown by people in times of war and shortage. When faced with a lack of...

Full article: https://mothership.sg/2017/09/british-prisoners-artworks-...

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